SUPPLE LEOPARD PDF

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preventing, treating, and resolving injury and pain, as well as improving mobility ( joint and tissue restrictions). Becoming a Supple Leopard (BASL) hit stores in. that have served us functionally—like jumping and landing with feet like a duck's —quickly become a liability Becoming a Supple Leopard. Becoming a Supple Leopard The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance Dr. Kelly Starrett with Glen Corif oza.


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Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Dr. Kelly Starrett—coach, physiotherapist, and author of download Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance: Read. Dr. Kelly Starrett - Becoming Supple casturtriweaklu.ml Download ( MB) · English · 日本語 · Português (Brazil) · Deutsch · Русский · Français · Svenska. In Becoming a Supple Leopard, Dr. Kelly Starrett—founder of casturtriweaklu.ml— shares his revolutionary approach to mobility and maintenance of the human.

This model, based on the movements and training of the day, has the added benefit of being psychologically manageable in scope and practice. Anyone can fix one problem at a time. But the typical list of dysfunction for the average athlete is just that, a list. The most important thing we can do is to get the athlete to train and address the problems along the way.

The priority remains training, not resolving what is probably a laundry list of dysfunction in one training session. I have yet to meet an athlete with perfect motor-control, mobility, and biomechanical efficiency. Hell, most of the really successful athletes I know are dumping huge amounts of torque, bleeding horrendous amounts of force, and missing key corners in their range-of-motion.

Yet they are still the best in the world.

A ten- or fifteen-minute intervention performed on the spot, within the context of the current training, is manageable and sustainable. The modern training session is a little miracle. Athletes are both greedy and smart—greedy in that they will do whatever it takes to get better in the shortest amount of time possible, and smart in that they will absolutely repeat specific practices and interventions that improve their performance or take away their pain.

The second benefit of using training exercises as a diagnostic tool is that it shifts the issues of lost or poor positioning from the realm of injury prevention to the realm of performance. This has twofold implication. Our goal is to make the best athletes in the world better.

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These are the metrics that matter, because functioning well is never a force-production or a work-output compromise. If we chase performance first, we get injury prevention in the bargain. If we obsess over the reasons behind poor positioning, we get better mechanical advantage, improved leverage, and more efficient force production.

But when she notices greater wattage output and decreased times, she is a believer and will reproduce the phenomenon herself. Using the training movements of the day as an instantaneous and ongoing diagnostic screening tool serves athletic development in other ways as well.

For example, assessing an athlete for mechanical dysfunction with common screening processes is primarily a snapshot 37 of that athlete on that day. Nothing is missed as long as an athlete is performing movements that express full range-of-motion and motor-control within those ranges.

This leads to another useful change in the conceptual framework of what the gym can and should be. The Gym Is Your Lab The modern strength-and-conditioning center should be considered a human-performance laboratory. The goal of both the coach and the athlete should be to exceed any strength, speed, or metabolic demand the athlete might need in life, sport, or shift on the SWAT team. It should also be the place where the coach and athlete hunt out every positional inefficiency, every poor mechanical tendency, and every default or compensatory movement pattern.

Where else can the athlete safely expose his movement and tissue dysfunctions? For example, most movement screens, quick-movement tests, or range-of-motion tests are performed statically and without any external load.

We regularly see athletes who can correctly perform an overhead squat with a PVC pipe. This is the most challenging squat iteration because it has high hip and ankle demands: The athlete must keep his torso absolutely upright and his shoulders stable while the load is locked out overhead. But what if we take that same person and have him or her run meters, then overhead squat anything heavier than a barbell for more than a few repetitions, all while competing against someone else?

We end up with a totally different athlete. And all we did was add a little bit of volume, intensity, stress, and metabolic demand to the overhead squat.

Very quickly, and very safely, we make the invisible visible. The point is that the athlete who flashes the quick test will sometimes fall apart under real-life working conditions. We just have to adjust load, volume, and intensity to match the abilities and capacities of the athlete. We should be seeking thresholds where our athletes begin to breakdown, and use that not only as an assessment and diagnostic tool, but also as a way to make the athlete better.

Coaches have always done this in the gym, but typically only by challenging the athlete with load and sometimes with repetition. There are great athletes who can buffer their 39 movement dysfunctions—meaning that they can hide their mobility restrictions and poor technique—for short periods of time, but regularly lose effective positioning when they begin to fatigue even a little.

But if an athlete has the mobility and motor-control to maintain a stable spine, hips, and knees during a brutal working couplet of heavy front squats and running, then that athlete is more likely to be able to reproduce that efficient mechanical positioning when it matters the most say, in the last meters of the Olympic rowing final.

As I said, the gym is the lab. That coach would not only have to be a world-class expert in hundreds of sports and have perfect timing —catching the athlete when he or she just happens to break down—he would also need the skill set to correct those faults within the context of that particular sport.

All they need to do is repurpose the training movements so that they also serve as diagnostic tools. For example, we regularly work with world-class athletes who cannot perform the most basic and light deadlifting, squatting, or pushups without horribly dysfunctional movement. If an athlete understands the principles of, say, midline 40 stabilization and shoulder-torque development—both of which are covered in this book—he will be able to apply those principles to another set of movement demands.

Running is just maintaining a braced and neutral spine while falling forward and extending the hip. And rowing looks an awful lot like performing a light deadlift while breathing really, really hard.

For the strength coach, this is invaluable insight. The athlete who has few mobility restrictions and understands and has been training in principle-based movement is literally a blank canvas for the coach. But if we connect the dots for our athletes, drawing their attention to the principles inherent in these movements, they can apply those principles to the new set of variables that is their sport.

Think about it like this: If a person understands grammar and spelling, then he can write a sentence. Conversely, if the coach observes that the athlete loses effective shoulder stability in the bottom of a bench press, that pattern will probably present as a more vulnerable and less effective shoulder position during tackling. At any age, and in nearly any state, the human animal is capable of an incredible amount of tissue repair and remodeling.

For example, I was in an elevator in Las Vegas a few years ago with another coach with whom I was teaching a course on human performance at a local gym. Case in point: page Turn here and you ll find Starrett using the Captain Morgan pose to help explain how to keep a neutral spine when standing all day. Brilliant and informative. After all, we all have a little Captain in us.

But that s only because there are a lot of freaking words! For some that would be a bad, but in this case, you shouldn t be reading it all at once.

The whole idea is to break it into pieces. Find the exercises that you need due to poor athletic performance or past injury and read up. When you re in pain and want answers, trust me. You ll be grateful for just how deep Starrett gets. Extras: When I think of Kelly Starrett, I think primarily of mobility, but he has so much more to offer and he does just that.

Specifically, he shows you proper techniques and movement patterns for just about every exercise you ll ever see in a WOD, including O-lifts. That s a special kind of wonderful all on it s own. I even love a good quirky title, but this one just feels a touch, um, dirty. In fact, one of my CrossFitting pals pointed out that he left this book out in the open before he and his wife left the kids with the babysitter. He s pretty sure the babysitter thought it was a sex book, because a few odd looks came their way after spotting it.

If you have to start hiding your rehab book in a 50 Shades of Gray sort of way, maybe it s time for a different title. Or it s the most ingenious marketing ever. Probably the latter. However, you most likely will never pay the sticker price since places like site and Barnes and Noble are always kicking a percentage off.

My advice, shop around. Website: It s sort of a backward criticism, but I m bummed that Starrett s website is now mostly a paid subscription site.

I get it, why download the book if you can get it all for free and in video version online. They look as if they were hit by cars and stricken by disease.

Yes, you say, but they finished. And this is true. Being task-completion obsessed certainly has its place, like in the Olympic finals, a world championship, the Super Bowl, or a military mission. But even then, there may be a heavy price to pay. So how do you keep people from harming themselves?

You need a set of leading indicators—a set of observable, measurable, and repeatable diagnostic tools that allow you to predict potential problems before they manifest as a recognizable disorder. The good news is that we already possess this information. By exposing people to a broad palette of 34 movements, by making people express body control through full, normal ranges of motion, we are able to expose holes and inefficiencies in their motor-control and mobility.

We can make the invisible visible. This means that while we are training for a stronger set of legs, or a bigger set of lungs, we are simultaneously thinking in terms of diagnostics. The deadlift is no longer just a matter of picking up something heavy from the floor.

Rather, it becomes a dynamic question: Does the athlete have the capacity to keep his spine efficiently braced and stable and express full posterior-chain range-of-motion while picking up something and breathing hard in a stressful environment? That means you not only have to understand why the movement is performed, but also how to do it correctly. Repurposing training so that it also serves as a diagnostic tool is useful on many other fronts as well.

Systematically and effectively assessing and screening for movement problems in athletes can be an enormous moving target at best and a colossal exercise in misplaced precision at worst.

Any system or set of tools that helps us better understand what is going on under the hood is a good thing. It needs to be topical, addressing the issues that the coach is seeing that day, with that set of athletes, with those movements. Ultimately, it has to be able to render changes that both the coach and the athlete can observe, measure, and repeat. Over time, this daily combination of training and assessment frees the coach and athlete to work through and discover problems systematically.

What you have to remember is that human movement is complex 35 and nuanced. Marrying the diagnostic process to the training process ensures that no stone will go unturned. Nor do we need to assess and address every deficiency in the athlete in a single day. This is how we become better athletes.

This model, based on the movements and training of the day, has the added benefit of being psychologically manageable in scope and practice. Anyone can fix one problem at a time. But the typical list of dysfunction for the average athlete is just that, a list. The most important thing we can do is to get the athlete to train and address the problems along the way.

The priority remains training, not resolving what is probably a laundry list of dysfunction in one training session. I have yet to meet an athlete with perfect motor-control, mobility, and biomechanical efficiency. Hell, most of the really successful athletes I know are dumping huge amounts of torque, bleeding horrendous amounts of force, and missing key corners in their range-of-motion. Yet they are still the best in the world.

A ten- or fifteen-minute intervention performed on the spot, within the context of the current training, is manageable and sustainable. The modern training session is a little miracle.

Athletes are both greedy and smart—greedy in that they will do whatever it takes to get better in the shortest amount of time possible, and smart in that they will absolutely repeat specific practices and interventions that improve their performance or take away their pain. The second benefit of using training exercises as a diagnostic tool is that it shifts the issues of lost or poor positioning from the realm of injury prevention to the realm of performance. This has twofold implication.

Our goal is to make the best athletes in the world better. These are the metrics that matter, because functioning well is never a force-production or a work-output compromise. If we chase performance first, we get injury prevention in the bargain. If we obsess over the reasons behind poor positioning, we get better mechanical advantage, improved leverage, and more efficient force production.

Tiger versus lion

But when she notices greater wattage output and decreased times, she is a believer and will reproduce the phenomenon herself. Using the training movements of the day as an instantaneous and ongoing diagnostic screening tool serves athletic development in other ways as well. For example, assessing an athlete for mechanical dysfunction with common screening processes is primarily a snapshot 37 of that athlete on that day.

Nothing is missed as long as an athlete is performing movements that express full range-of-motion and motor-control within those ranges. This leads to another useful change in the conceptual framework of what the gym can and should be.

The Gym Is Your Lab The modern strength-and-conditioning center should be considered a human-performance laboratory. The goal of both the coach and the athlete should be to exceed any strength, speed, or metabolic demand the athlete might need in life, sport, or shift on the SWAT team.

It should also be the place where the coach and athlete hunt out every positional inefficiency, every poor mechanical tendency, and every default or compensatory movement pattern.

Where else can the athlete safely expose his movement and tissue dysfunctions? The hallmark of any good strength-and-conditioning program is twofold: For example, most movement screens, quick-movement tests, or range-of-motion tests are performed statically and without any external load. We regularly see athletes who can correctly perform an overhead squat with a PVC pipe. This is the most challenging squat iteration because it has high hip and ankle demands: The athlete must keep his torso absolutely upright and his shoulders stable while the load is locked out overhead.

But what if we take that same person and have him or her run meters, then overhead squat anything heavier than a barbell for more than a few repetitions, all while competing against someone else? We end up with a totally different athlete. And all we did was add a little bit of volume, intensity, stress, and metabolic demand to the overhead squat. Very quickly, and very safely, we make the invisible visible.

Kelly Starrett “Becoming a Supple Leopard” 50 Page Sample PDF Download

The point is that the athlete who flashes the quick test will sometimes fall apart under real-life working conditions. We just have to adjust load, volume, and intensity to match the abilities and capacities of the athlete. We should be seeking thresholds where our athletes begin to breakdown, and use that not only as an assessment and diagnostic tool, but also as a way to make the athlete better.

Coaches have always done this in the gym, but typically only by challenging the athlete with load and sometimes with repetition. There are great athletes who can buffer their 39 movement dysfunctions—meaning that they can hide their mobility restrictions and poor technique—for short periods of time, but regularly lose effective positioning when they begin to fatigue even a little. But if an athlete has the mobility and motor-control to maintain a stable spine, hips, and knees during a brutal working couplet of heavy front squats and running, then that athlete is more likely to be able to reproduce that efficient mechanical positioning when it matters the most say, in the last meters of the Olympic rowing final.

As I said, the gym is the lab. That coach would not only have to be a world-class expert in hundreds of sports and have perfect timing —catching the athlete when he or she just happens to break down—he would also need the skill set to correct those faults within the context of that particular sport. All they need to do is repurpose the training movements so that they also serve as diagnostic tools. For example, we regularly work with world-class athletes who cannot perform the most basic and light deadlifting, squatting, or pushups without horribly dysfunctional movement.

If an athlete understands the principles of, say, midline 40 stabilization and shoulder-torque development—both of which are covered in this book—he will be able to apply those principles to another set of movement demands. Running is just maintaining a braced and neutral spine while falling forward and extending the hip.

And rowing looks an awful lot like performing a light deadlift while breathing really, really hard. For the strength coach, this is invaluable insight. The athlete who has few mobility restrictions and understands and has been training in principle-based movement is literally a blank canvas for the coach. Remember, classical strength-and-conditioning movements gymnastics, Olympic lifting, powerlifting, sprinting, etc.

But if we connect the dots for our athletes, drawing their attention to the principles inherent in these movements, they can apply those principles to the new set of variables that is their sport.

Think about it like this: If a person understands grammar and spelling, then he can write a sentence. Conversely, if the coach observes that the athlete loses effective shoulder stability in the bottom of a bench press, that pattern will probably present as a more vulnerable and less effective shoulder position during tackling. At any age, and in nearly any state, the human animal is capable of an incredible amount of tissue repair and remodeling.

For example, I was in an elevator in Las Vegas a few years ago with another coach with whom I was teaching a course on human performance at a local gym. On the way down, the elevator stopped and a woman got on. This woman was at least as wide as she was tall. She was holding one of those very long, fifty-plus-ounce beer cups with a big straw, carrying a bag of pastries, and smoking.

The best part was, she apparently felt great! She was stoked and actually flirted with the two of us during our short time together! When she got out, we both looked at each other in awe. Human beings are very hard to kill. Our bodies will put up with our silly movement and lifestyle choices because they have a freakish amount of functional tolerance built in. This incredible mountain of a woman illustrates a larger point: Most of the typical musculoskeletal dysfunction that people and athletes deal with is really just preventable disease.

That which accounts for 2 percent of movement dysfunction in a 42 typical gym: Pathology something serious is going on with your system 2. It sounds like you have the makings of a kidney infection. Based on that bright red ring around that suspicious bite on your arm, you may need to get checked out for Lyme disease. Pathology is dealt with through traditional medicine and honestly accounts for about a whopping 1 percent or less of the typical problems we see in the gym.

Catastrophic Injury This category includes getting hit by a car, jumping downwind out of an airplane at night and landing on a stump, or having a three hundred pound lineman roll into your knee. This is where modern sports medicine excels. Bad things are going to happen to soldiers and athletes working to their limits in their respective fields. Reconstruction and injury-management capabilities are at an all-time high.

Fortunately, except for wounded warriors, this category also falls into the 1 percent bucket. So if we have accounted for roughly 2 percent of the typical 43 movement dysfunction we catch in the gym, where do the other 98 percent reside? Simple, they reside within the preventable-disease categories of overtension and open-circuit faulting. That which accounts for 98 percent of all the dysfunction we see in the typical athlete: Overtension missing range-of-motion 4.

Open-circuit faults moving in a bad position Overtension We regularly observe athletes who lack significant ranges of motion. But my neck and wrist kill me every time I eat. Move your hand to your face as if you are going to eat. Is there resistance in this range-of-motion? Your limbs and joints should get stiff near end-range and then suddenly stop.

They should not be limited in range nor be excessively stiff through full range-of-motion. Either symptom is a simple sign that your tissue-based mechanical system is overtensioned. In nearly every athlete we evaluate for compensated mechanics or 44 for injured and painful tissues, we find an obvious and significant restriction in the joints or tissues immediately above or below the site of the dysfunction.

Achilles tendinopathy? Weird that your calf is brutally short and stiff and that your ankle has no dorsiflexion. To put it simply: If you have ankle pain, chances are good that your calves are tight and are pulling on your ankle, limiting your range-of-motion. If you have knee pain, chances are good that your quads, hips, hamstrings, and calves all the musculature that connects to your knee are brutally tight.

A tight hinge on a door will have a pile of dust underneath it. So if the tissues surrounding your knee—quads and calves—are tight, you will literally have a pile of meniscus dust underneath it. The brutally stiff tissues upstream and downstream of the joint cause a mechanical deformation that affects how the joint moves and operates.

What does ultimately matter, however, is that if the system is overtensioned, it needs to be remedied—by addressing position and range-of-motion restrictions. Injuries like ACL tears, flexionrelated disk herniations, torn biceps tendons, labral tears of the hip and shoulder, and torn Achilles tendons belong in this category. It operates best when it is able to create ideal, stable positions before it generates freakish outputs of power.

In fact, most people are familiar with the maxim that functional movement begins in a wave of contraction from the core to sleeve, from trunk to periphery, from axial skeleton to peripheral skeleton.

This principle is a good example of the body operating best when all of its circuits are closed—spine stable and braced, hip stable, shoulder stable, ankle not collapsed, etc. The problem is that the body will always be able to generate force, even in poor positions. This is not unlike being able to temporarily get away with driving your car with no oil in the engine or with a flat tire.

Sure, you can do it; it just gets expensive. Children with cerebral palsy have damaged motor-control systems in their brains. Yet these children are able to ambulate despite this. Their bodies are clever enough to default to a collapsed arch and ankle, internally rotated and valgus knee, internally rotated and impinged hip, and overextended lumbar spine.If you practice them in the order presented, you will know how to stabilize your spine in a braced, wellorganized position; how to maintain good posture during loaded, dynamic movements; and how to create stability in your joints to generate maximum force, power, and speed.

Kelly's work is not limited to coaches and athletes - he applies his methods to children, desk jockeys, and anyone dealing with injury and chronic pain. When you re in pain and want answers, trust me. He made it clear that he could never have achieved his extraordinary career without the tens of thousands of mostly pedestrian hours he and his coaches and training partners had spent together, pushing and refining their training.

They retreated from each other, limping into the forest. If we chase performance first, we get injury prevention in the bargain. After they temporarily retreated from each other, the hunter could see that they were both injured. You could ultimately become the human equivalent of a supple leopard, always poised and ready for action.

JAIME from Evansville
I do relish studying docunments crossly . Feel free to read my other posts. I have only one hobby: association football.
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